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Wires and Nerve, Volume 2: Gone Rogue

Review

Wires and Nerve, Volume 2: Gone Rogue

Written by Marissa Meyer and illustrated by Stephen Gilpin.

Iko is an android --- she’s more accustomed to picking out outfits or admiring shoes than to saving the known world. But she is also loyal to her friend Cinder, and that means undertaking an adventure to the moon and back in order to put an end to Alpha Lysander Steele’s reign of terror. With a surly royal guard named Liam Kinney by her side, Iko embarks and finds that Steele is determined to get what he wants and will do anything to get it.

All the while, Iko is discovering truths about her own past and programming. Friends and allies in tow, Iko must discover Steele’s plans and --- perhaps more importantly --- she must discover what it really means to be human.

"I would 100% recommend this book to anyone who loves science fiction. And, of course, to everybody who read and loved the Lunar Chronicles series!"

I think this book is pretty different from the original Lunar Chronicles series, probably because of the fact that it’s a graphic novel. Not that graphic novels are somehow worse than regular books, but in the original series, one of the greatest things was the way that every single scene was described in amazingly vivid imagery. I could picture nearly everything in my mind’s eye. But with this book, the descriptions are (obviously) cut out and replaced with actual images. And another thing about the format --- with graphic novels, the entire reading experience is somewhat different, due to the fact that you can’t picture the characters or settings in any way different than the way they are on the page. Many of the characters were actually drawn very well and were very accurate to their descriptions in the original series, but a few were just not quite what I’d pictured while reading the books, which was off-putting.

On the positive side, the actual flow of the story in the panels of the comic was very easy to understand and I didn’t need to re-read a single page three dozen times in order to understand what was being said. The scenes which involved action or fighting were easy to understand and were illustrated well. Also, the format provides an excellent opportunity for humor. You can add a panel free of dialogue and it can make a perfect awkward silence or pause after a joke.

As much as it pains me to say (or, I guess, to type) this about a villain, Alpha Steele was written in a way that showed him as an actual, realistic character (aside from the fact that he’s, you know, a genetically modified wolf-dude). I most definitely do not like him as a person, but his refusal to accept that there was no cure for his mutations was something that is incredibly realistic and something that happens in real life. People will deny the fact that there is no way out of many things, and I think that this situation was a good representation of it.

The title of the book made next to no sense to me, as the story has nothing that would at all reference that Iko had “gone rogue.” She breaks exactly zero laws and doesn’t even go undercover. It’s a very cool title, but it isn’t one of those that gives you a burst of realization at some point in the book, and I found that sort of irritating.

Iko is also somewhat less of the excitable, bubbly character that she was in the original series. Now, this could be seen as the author not staying true to her characters, but I think it shows first-rate character development. Considering all that Iko was put through in the previous book, it makes sense that she might’ve become more serious than she was portrayed as being in the Lunar Chronicles. Along the same lines, Kinney has gradually become more accepting of Iko through the story, which I also really enjoy.

In summary, I would 100% recommend this book to anyone who loves science fiction. And, of course, to everybody who read and loved the Lunar Chronicles series!

Reviewed by Nina L., Teen Board Member on February 13, 2019

Wires and Nerve, Volume 2: Gone Rogue
Written by Marissa Meyer and illustrated by Stephen Gilpin.